The approach of the thunderbirds

The thunderbird a legendary creature in certain Indigenous peoples of North American is said to create thunder by flapping its wings (Algonqian) and lightning by flashing its eyes (Algonquian, Iroquois).

In Algonquian mythology, the thunderbird controls the upper world while the underworld is controlled by the underwater panther or Great Horned Serpent. The thunderbird creates not just thunder (with its wing-flapping), but lightning bolts, which it cast at the underworld creatures.[1]

Thunderbirds in this tradition may be depicted as a spread-eagled bird (wings horizontal head in profile), but also quite commonly with the head facing forward, thus presenting an X-shaped appearance overall[4] (see under ┬žIconography below).

Ojibwe

Ojibwe shoulder pouch depicting two thunderbirds in quillworkPeabody Museum Harvard

The Ojibwe version of the myth states that the thunderbirds were created by Nanabozho for the purpose of fighting the underwater spirits. They were also used to punish humans who broke moral rules. The thunderbirds lived in the four directions and arrived with the other birds in the springtime. In the fall they migrated south after the ending of the underwater spirits’ most dangerous season.[5]

Menomine

Seal of the Menominee Nationfeaturing a thunderbird

The Menominee of Northern Wisconsin tell of a great mountain that floats in the western sky on which dwell the thunderbirds. They control the rain and hail and delight in fighting and deeds of greatness. They are the enemies of the great horned snakes (the Misikinubik) and have prevented these from overrunning the earth and devouring mankind. They are messengers of the Great Sun himself.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thunderbird_(mythology)

https://folkways.si.edu/healing-songs-of-the-american-indians/music/album/smithsonian

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